Mom at home scientist

Ecology of my motherhood; analyzed, frugal, and (mostly) natural.


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Grain-free, Gluten-free Stromboli

Stromboli done well- grain-free

Stromboli done well- grain-free

So… it has been awhile since my last post, but let me tell you, I have only been up to good! Ha! Well, and morning sickness did put a dent in my activities after harvest season. So, as a juicy little starter, I want to share a great creation using my delicious tapioca cheese bread recipe that the sexy chemist, my hubby, came up with. You don’t need a degree to pull this one off though. Grain-free Stromboli… uhm… YUM!

 

Cheesy, grain-free delicious pepperoni Stromboli

Cheesy, grain-free delicious pepperoni Stromboli

As you can see, my little minion agrees…

 

Approved Stromboli!

Approved Stromboli!

First, start out by making one batch of cheese bread dough. The recipe is here.

Now, instead of creating rolls, you want to roll the dough out, into a rectangle, until it is a little thicker than pie crust… roughly 1/2cm. We end up using from ½ to ¾ of the cheese bread. Traditionally, people use a rolling pin but I like to use a wine bottle, as that is what I have on hand. I think it is easiest to roll the dough off of your surface if you put wax or parchment paper under it first. If you would like to mimic the cornmeal that is typically spread under a pizza crust, we roughly blended some buckwheat grits until it reached the desired size, and used that instead.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

After getting your dough rolled out, we layered mozzarella cheese, cheddar cheese, pepperoni sausage, and mushrooms on all but the top 2 inches of the long side of our rectangle. This is really the step where you customize your pizza to your tastes, so use the ingredients you choose!

At this point, you want to gently start to roll up your Stromboli, starting with the bottom, long-side of your rectangle, until you use the whole dough. I prefer to finish the rolling on the cookie sheet or jelly-roll pan I plan on cooking it on. The longer you work the dough, the warmer it gets, the more fragile and hard-to-work-with it becomes.

Now you need to pinch the dough, along the final long edge, somewhat to get it to seal to the layer below it. You may have some tears along your dough surface, don’t worry about it because now you don’t need to put a few slits on top. If your roll is perfect, congrats and you can put a few decorative slits along the top where you want them!

Be sure to switch your oven to bake mode.

Bake for roughly 30-40 min. or until it looks nicely brown to you. This time can really vary by oven and the thickness of your Stromboli.

While my bread is cooking, I like to make my own pizza sauce to dip my Stromboli in. You could buy this, or use spaghetti sauce even, but I prefer my homemade recipe anyways.

Enjoy the wonderful grain-free goodness that you have just created!

Stromboli finished

Stromboli finished


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Fall is in the Air

Jenn:

I don’t usually reblog, but this story is about my visit to my family farm in Oregon. Many of the same gardening scenarios are playing out here in Ohio as well. I will add that I made a killer fresh fermented salsa from my father’s produce! I really should share… but for now, YUM!

Originally posted on Hubbard's Garden Shed:

August 2014 007

The squash are slowing down, but we still have quite a bit!  The winter squash will be ready before you know it.

The squash are slowing down, but we still have quite a bit! The winter squash will be ready before you know it.

It seems crazy that the summer could pass so fast, but already we are waking up to crisp cool mornings and witnessing the slow down in production from the garden. Our month was busy here, not only with the picking, watering, a broken water pump, and attempting to keep up with some of the weeds, but also with a visit from one of our other sisters/daughters from back East and a family reunion!

The Hubbard girls, all together back on the farm for a brief time.

The Hubbard girls, all together back on the farm for a brief time.

The last of the corn has now been picked, and we’re lucky if there is any still in the garden shed to be sold at this very moment. Harvesting our practically legendary sweet corn has been quite effective at bringing customers out…

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Real Science and Natural Wonder; Dandelion to Prevent Atherosclerosis

Dandelion Flower from Wikimedia

Sometimes I come across a study that is too good not to share! Just a heads up disclaimer though; these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. That doesn’t mean there isn’t any real merit though, just that dandelions aren’t a regulated drug. This doesn’t mean that they aren’t AS effective, or more so, than drugs you may be prescribed, but only that they aren’t a patentable creation that would garner enough profit to pay for the regulatory system and the expensive studies needed for their rubber-stamp of approval.

So, the study I stumbled across is from the International Journal of Molecular Sciences and is titled, “Hypolipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) Root and Leaf on Cholesterol-Fed Rabbits.” You can find the article here.

In a nutshell, there were 4 groups of animals. The control group (the normal one) received a regular rabbit diet, a high-cholesterol group, a high-cholesterol and dandelion leaf supplemented group, and a high-cholesterol and dandelion root supplemented group.

What they found was that dandelion greatly affected the rabbits by reducing artery damage by cholesterol, lowered “bad” cholesterol, raised “good” cholesterol and acted as a potent antioxidant. Antioxidants are known to be beneficial by protecting dietary lipids from oxidation, suppressing the onset and development of atherosclerosis, and reducing the progression of atherosclerosis lesions .

So there you have it! Eat dandelions!!!

So, how do you go about it? Dandelions taste best in the spring but are still beneficial to eat throughout the year. This spring, I dug up a lot of dandelions. I chopped up roots finely, dried them and then ran them through a blender. This created a great medium for use as tea, or to add to your broth that you make as a base for meals.

IMG_6433

I used the tops as greens in salads and on sandwiches in place of lettuce. I threw the greens, flowers and roots into broths and into the freezer for future stock making. I chopped the leaves up and sauteed them with the goodies for omelets. My mother in-law even suggested battering and frying up the flowers, but it was too late in the season by the time I thought I’d try that. Next year I plan to make dandelion wine and dandelion chocolate too! :-)

 

 

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(1), 67-78; doi:10.3390/ijms11010067


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Gluten-free, Grain-free Tapioca Cheese Bread; My Favorite Bread

Grain-free deliciousness

Grain-free deliciousness

I love the windows and doors to other recipes available to me in Spanish. Last year I stumbled upon this gem here while on laylita.com, a blog on Ecuadorian recipes. Although I had studied abroad in Ecuador, I never had the pleasure of eating this bread until I made it. It is originally called Pan de Yuca, which means Yucca Bread. We, here in the US, call yucca by the name of tapioca.

Pan de Yucca before baking

Pan de Yucca before baking

I particularly LOVE this bread for Oh so many reasons!
1)It is FAST
2) It is cheesy!
3) It is versatile!
4) It is grain-free
5) It is high in protein(for a bread) and healthy fats

IMG_6509

So I thought I would translate the recipe for you with healthier (the original is healthy, but some ingredients can be improved) ingredient suggestions!
This is great for gluten-free people too, as long as you shred your own cheese.

Tapioca (Cheese) Bread
20-25 rolls

2 1/2 Cups Tapioca Flour/Starch
4 Cups(1 Lb.) Shredded Mozzarella Cheese
1 Teaspoon Baking Powder (aluminum-free)
Pinch of Celtic Sea Salt (not bleached)
4 oz (1/2 cup) room temperature butter(from grass-fed cows)
2 eggs (pastured and fertilized)
If necessary, 1-2 Tablespoons of filtered water, if the dough is too dry to work into balls.

To Prepare:
Preheat oven to 500 F (that is not a typo!). In a food processor, combine flour, cheese, baking powder and salt & mix well. Add the butter, and eggs then mix until the dough forms small balls… or until it looks like it has mixed really well. This is where you would add the extra water if the dough seemed too dry.
Remove the dough from the processor and make golf-ball sized dough balls. Place on a cookie sheet or jelly roll pan. I usually only cook half of the recipe and save the rest in the fridge until another day. You can do this mixing all by hand in a bowl… just use your hands and all of the ingredients at once.
Bake for about 5-7 minutes at 500 F, then turn to broil setting and brown your rolls for about 3-5 minutes.

Grain-free deliciousness

Grain-free deliciousness

Then serve while warm, that is, if you don’t eat them all first! These go great with any soup, just as a side, and your kids will love them… to the point you feel like hiding them from the tots.

You can also adapte this recipe by substuting half of the mozzarella with sharp cheddar, as a reader posted in the comments, or jalapeno jack, if you want to add some kick!

Grain-free Tapioca cheese bread.

Grain-free Tapioca cheese bread.


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Eviction Notice Served- To The Ants

It really must be spring, as the ants had returned this week. This time the ante was upped; from small sugar ants to large carpenter ants. Ugh!!! They were everywhere… my kitchen, living room, dining room, climbing on me while I was nursing my daughter. Last year, I tried putting down a chalk border line as my mother in-law had heard that they wouldn’t cross it. Numbers may have dropped but it didn’t STOP them. I can’t get chalk everywhere anyways. So I was checking Facebook early Sunday morning before church and came across a blog entry by the Thrifty Couple regarding ants.. so I combined several of these ideas in a spray bottle and misted the entrances to my house before walking out the door. I am pleased to say that I have not seen any additional intruders since then.

Ant Eviction Spray

2 C. White distilled vinegar
3 small bay leaves
5 drops cinnamon essential oil
5 drops peppermint essential oil
5 drops clove essential oil

Throw these all in a spray bottle, remember to label your bottle, and have fun with the eviction. Bonus, the house smells a lot better too!


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My Ohio Garden Chores in Late April

What I am doing for my garden update:

1) I cut a sweet potato in half today (from last year’s garden) and I am letting the cut cure. Then I will place the cut directly on soil in a pot inside the house. It will go wild with shoots, which I will snap off of the tater and put in a water vase. Within two weeks of that it will have rooted sufficiently and it should be ready to plant… I do this bare rooted.They are pretty temperature sensitive though, so be careful of your timing on planting in the garden. I also like them in containers for trailing foliage.

2) Dear hubby bought me seed potatoes, grade A. So I will have to cut them up and let them cure after rolling them in sulfur, to prevent rotting, for a couple of days. Then they will get planted every 1.5 ft apart in a deeply worked row of the garden that usually gets infringed by shade earlier in the fall, due to the seasonal changing sun position. It won’t bother them though as they will have died off around that time already.
I actually prefer grade B potatoes as they are smaller and then you don’t have to cut and cure them, just plant them as they come.

3) I am still running wheelbarrow loads of rabbit manure to the garden and covering the soil with a tarp to warm it up, speed up mulch breakdown and cut down on weeds.

4) Dear hubby also picked up a cold-frame from the side of the road meant for trash pick-up (old windows on frame still) and I will start lettuce and mustard greens asap under it.

5) Looming clean-up remains for the strawberry bed for spring production… I’ve been considering scrapping them for all the work and little produce you get if you try to do them organically here in Ohio… and I want a sweeter variety. Any suggestions?

6) I am still removing Sun-chokes/Jerusalem artichokes and feeding them to my rabbits. I’d like to move them all down to the creek-side since they are native, and let them do their thing down there…

7) If you haven’t done it already,  get a soil testing kit at a greenhouse to see how your proposed garden area needs amended (what you need to add to it). Grab Jerry Baker’s Garden Secrets for do-able natural amendments… though I’m not too convinced on the  efficacy of his tonics.


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Herping for Fun

It’s about that time of year… to go herping(in the Northern states or high altitudes)!!! Herping is searching for herps (amphibians and reptiles). Anybody interested? A low-lying wetlands park would be perfect. Equipment needed: boots & willingness to get muddy… small nets would really help out too & pan to observe them in. An identification guide would also come in handy. I can’t wait! I could hear the Bufo americanus singing this afternoon. This would be great for homeschoolers needing hands on biology experience… coming soon, morel season!
Side note, I have now procurred a contract for raw cow’s milk through a herd share! I made delicious butter today in a mixer from the cream off of the top… sigh :-)

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